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VOLUME 23 , ISSUE 9 ( September, 2019 ) > List of Articles

CASE REPORT

Saccharomyces: A Friend or Foe in ICU (A Case Report with Solution)

Prasoon Gupta, YP Singh, Akhil Taneja

Keywords : Fungemia, Probiotic, Saccharomyces

Citation Information : Gupta P, Singh Y, Taneja A. Saccharomyces: A Friend or Foe in ICU (A Case Report with Solution). Indian J Crit Care Med 2019; 23 (9):430-431.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10071-23239

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 01-09-2019

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2019; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae or boulardii, also known as baker’s yeast or brewer’s yeast, is normally a nonpathogenic microbe. It is commonly used as a probiotic to prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea. We present a case of a 77-year-old woman with uncontrolled diabetes who developed Saccharomyces fungemia with use of Saccharomyces containing probiotic after 5 days of treatment. The probiotic was immediately discontinued. The indwelling central line was removed, she was started on amphotericin B and the fungemia resolved. This case report highlights this peculiar complication of probiotic use. We also find it important to increase the awareness amongst the healthcare providers about this likely risk while prescribing probiotics, especially for critically ill patients.


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