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VOLUME 26 , ISSUE 5 ( May, 2022 ) > List of Articles

Original Article

Comparing Important and Well-documented Potential Drug–Drug Interactions between Emergency, Medical, and Surgical ICUs of a Respiratory Referral Center

Zeinab Hosseinpoor, Behrooz Farzanegan, Shadi Baniasadi

Keywords : Drug–drug interactions, Intensive care unit, Potential drug–drug interaction, Prevalence

Citation Information : Hosseinpoor Z, Farzanegan B, Baniasadi S. Comparing Important and Well-documented Potential Drug–Drug Interactions between Emergency, Medical, and Surgical ICUs of a Respiratory Referral Center. Indian J Crit Care Med 2022; 26 (5):572-576.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10071-23902

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 30-04-2022

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2022; The Author(s).


Abstract

Introduction: Drug–drug interaction (DDI) is one of the major healthcare challenges in intensive care units (ICUs). The prevalence of DDIs and interacting drug pairs may vary between different types of ICUs. This study aimed to compare the frequency and nature of important and well-documented potential DDIs (pDDIs) in three types of ICUs. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in medical (M), surgical (S), and emergency (E) ICUs of a tertiary referral center for respiratory diseases. A pharmacist checked the patients’ files three days in a week for 6 months. The pDDIs were identified using the Lexi-Interact database. Interactions with a severity rating of D (modify regimen) and X (avoid combination) and with a reliability rating of good and excellent were considered important and well-documented. These pDDIs were evaluated in terms of drug combinations, mechanisms of interaction, and clinical management. Results: One hundred eighty-nine patients admitted to MICU, SICU, and EICU were included in the study. The percentage of patients who experienced at least one important and well-documented pDDI was 18.8% in MICU, 11.1% in SICU, and 11.8% in EICU. The most common drug pairs causing important and well-documented interactions were atracurium + hydrocortisone in MICU, meropenem + valproic acid in MICU and EICU, and aspirin + warfarin in SICU. Conclusion: The current study shows different frequency and nature of pDDIs between three types of ICUs. We recommend conducting similar studies in other settings to develop evidence-based guidance on clinically relevant pDDIs in different types of ICUs.


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